Feed by M.T. Anderson

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Anderson, M.T. Feed. Candlewick Press, 2002. $16.99, 240 pages.

Link to Author’s Website:  http://mt-anderson.com/

Links to Interviews with Author:

Links to Reviews Available Online:

Reader’s Annotation:

What if technology could tell you everything you ever wanted or needed before you even knew you wanted or needed it?

Summary:

Titus and his friends are ordinary teens on spring break to the moon.  They are constantly inundated with information from their “feeds,” devices implanted into their brains that customizes and personalizes information about anything from music to fashion to food to international news.  Using their feeds, Titus and his friends can even send each other chats and do not have to communicate using speech!  Spring break is rather disappointing for Titus until he meets Violet, a girl unlike any he has ever known before.  Her father teaches dead languages and wears an outdated feed, she has not always had a feed, she thinks and talks about things other than what the feeds tells them, she even resists the feed and practices delayed gratification, unheard of in their society of instantaneous purchase and consumption.  While Titus enjoys this novelty, Violet also enjoys being a “normal” teenager, going to parties and on dates with Titus, who fills the role of the boyfriend she met on spring break.  A wrench is thrown in their romance when they are hacked at a club and their feeds disabled.  Titus soon resumes life as normal, but the effects of the hack are more severe for Violet.  Titus is forced to face the harsh reality of life where customer service doesn’t save the day, where buying a thousand pairs of pants can’t fix all problems, where sickness is debilitating, and where the feed does not overcome all.

Evaluation:

In a digital world where technology is ever present, this book foreshadowed the dangers of over-reliance and overindulgence with technology.  The writing style is used to symbolize the breakdown of relationships and communication by the difficulty with physical speech.  Statements end with question marks, implying that they are questioning their own thoughts.  Blocks of speech longer than one sentence that occur outside of the chat are conveyed with a few key phrases between “da da da.”  Characters seem to have a hard time finding words to say, using placeholders like “like,” “uh,” and “things” while they are searching for the right words, which, ironically, are often suggested by the feed.   The detachment of the characters is terrifying but believable.  In a world that is increasingly plugged in and obsessed with possession, the plot is also quite viable.  This chilling portrayal of a future society is no doubt why it was nominated for so many awards.

Rating Scale:

  • Popularity: 3
  • Quality: 4

Genre and Subgenre:  science fiction, sociological science fiction

Appeal Factors:  technology, relationships, being constantly plugged in

Readalike Titles or Authors:

  • Orleans by Sherri Smith
  • Proxy by Alex London

Awards Won and Book Lists:

  • National Book Award finalist
  • Boston Globe Horn Book Award honor

Booktalking Ideas:

  • Description of what the teens experience through their feeds
  • The novelty of a tree in the park
  • The crash after the virus

Book Discussion Questions or Ideas:

  • How has Titus changed by the end of the novel?
  • Is there a danger of overpersonalization of technology?
  • Was it worth it for Violet to get the feed to fit in?

Why I Chose This:

I chose this book because of the idea of constantly being plugged in.  I thought that this is quite relevant to the youth of today.  It also had interesting commentary on consumerism, social class, and the control of the flow of information.

The Giver by Lois Lowry

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Lowry, Lois.  The Giver.  Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing, 1993.  $13.95, 208 pages.

Link to Author’s Website:  http://www.loislowry.com/

Links to Interviews with Author:

Links to Reviews Available Online:

Reader’s Annotation:  Jonas is given a gift that changes the way he sees his world.

Summary:

Turning twelve is a big deal in the community where Jonas lives.  It is at the Ceremony of Twelves that children find out the track that they will follow for the rest of their lives.  In a strange twist, Jonas receives a special assignment, to be the new Giver.  It is through training with the Giver that slowly he is given the memories of the community.  These memories are withheld from the populace of the very controlled community.  As Jonas receives more memories, he realizes horrible things about the way that his community is run.  Although all the needs are provided for, people’s choices are taken away from them.  To exacerbate the situation, the newborn that Jonas’ father is charged with taking care of will be “released” because he is not developing well.  Jonas cannot let this happen to Gabe, and so plans an escape.  This story ends with Jonas and Gabe’s future uncertain.

Evaluation:

This is a classic and timeless award winner.  It fits well with the dystopian trend of late.  Jonas’ coming of age story takes the loss of innocence of childhood to a whole new level, with the knowledge that Jonas learns turning everything he knows about himself, his family, and his community on its head.  It is masterfully written with the realization coming slowly for the reader as it does for Jonas.  The world that Lowry builds is amazingly detailed, from the nuclear family unit and the way they are assigned children, to the yearly ceremonies and the uniform milestones, to the adult assignments, pills citizens are required to take, and the releasing of nonconformists. Even the fact that the people in the community cannot see color creates this spookily controlled dystopia.  Jonas’ plight is sympathetic, and the reader roots for Jonas as he makes his decision to leave his community.  The complexity of the plot does make this a challenging read, but the language and the writing style are more easily accessible.

Rating Scale:

  • Popularity:1 – Would sit on shelves unread; 2 – May see the light of day as an assigned reading; 3 – Interesting to readers, may need marketing; 4 – Very appealing read, ; 5 – Need multiple copies, because it would always be checked out!
  • Quality: 1 – How was this book ever published?; 2 – Poor literary quality; 3 – Average literary quality, nothing stands out as exceptional; 4 – Overall high quality literary quality, with certain areas of exceptional literary quality; 5 – Well-crafted of the highest literary quality
  • Popularity: 4
  • Quality: 5

Genre and Subgenre: science fiction, dystopia, future world, coming of age

Appeal Factors:  dystopian novel, coming of age, adventure,

Readalike Titles or Authors:

  • The Diary of Pelly D
  • Armageddon’s Children
  • Gossamer

Awards Won and Book Lists:

  • 1994 Newbery Medal
  • Boston Globe-Horn Book Honor Book
  • Notable Children’s Books
  • Best Books for Young Adults

Booktalking Ideas:

  • Ceremonies and milestones
  • Jonas’ assignment
  • Receiving a memory

Book Discussion Questions or Ideas:

  • What clues show that Jonas society might be one found in the future?
  • Is it better to live in a community like Jonas’s or to have freedom to choose and feel, even if it includes painful feelings?
  • What other options does Jonas have at the end of the novel?

Why I Chose This:

I chose this novel because it is a classic read in many classrooms.  I was also surprised to learn that it is one of the most challenged books!  I also enjoy dystopian novels, and wondered how it would compare to similar titles written today.  The world that Lowry created really amazed me and pulled me in.

The House of the Scorpion by Nancy Farmer

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Farmer, Nancy.  The House of the Scorpion.  Simon & Schuster, 2002.  $17.95, 400 pages.

Link to Author’s Website:  http://www.nancyfarmerwebsite.com

Links to Interviews with Author:

Links to Reviews Available Online:

Reader’s Annotation:

When Matt realizes his sole reason for existing is to be replacement parts for a drug lord, he takes his future into his own hands.

Summary:

After Matt is successfully bred in a test tube, he goes to live uneventfully with the cook who works for El Patron.  By chance, Matt ends up at El Patron’s estate Opium, where he is recognized as El Patron’s clone.  The Alacran family treats Matt like an animal after making this discovery, however, Matt is unaware of who he is.  His only friends are Cecilia, the cook he lived with, Maria, the daughter of a senator, and Tam Lin, his bodyguard.  Matt is forced to face the truth when El Patron himself verifies that he is indeed a clone, and that he plans on harvesting his organs when his own fail.  Matt then makes the decision to escape, leaving behind everything and everyone he has known to become his own person.

Evaluation:

Being a science fiction work, this novel asks readers to stretch their imagination beyond what is viable with current technology. Despite this stretch of imagination, Matt’s character is believable as an emotional teenager who is trying to figure out who he is.  He even tests the boundaries of his own power the same way teens test boundaries.  Farmer’s writing style produces a chilling portrait of the future of Mexico and the drug trade.  She builds suspense around the discovery of Matt’s identity.  The language is contemporary but complex, painting a vivid picture of the characters and the plot.  Thematically, Farmer deals with themes of power and identity, of the ethics of cloning and slavery, and of family and belonging.  These complex themes bring up great discussion points and make the story much deeper than an interesting plot.

Rating Scale:

  • Popularity:1 – Would sit on shelves unread; 2 – May see the light of day as an assigned reading; 3 – Interesting to readers, may need marketing; 4 – Very appealing read, ; 5 – Need multiple copies, because it would always be checked out!
  • Quality: 1 – How was this book ever published?; 2 – Poor literary quality; 3 – Average literary quality, nothing stands out as exceptional; 4 – Overall high quality literary quality, with certain areas of exceptional literary quality; 5 – Well-crafted of the highest literary quality
  • Popularity: 4
  • Quality: 4

Genre and Subgenre:  science fiction – dystopia, bioengineering; adventure – survival

Appeal Factors: cloning, dystopia, mystery, action, adventure

Readalike Titles or Authors:

  • Tomorrow When the War Began by John Marsden
  • Feed by M.T. Anderson
  • Singing the Dogstar Blues by Alison Goodman

Awards Won and Book Lists:

  • National Book Award
  • Printz Winner
  • Newbery Honor Book

Booktalking Ideas:

  • The setting of Opium and the estate
  • Maria and Matt’s decision to run away
  • Confronting El Patron about his purpose in life as a clone

Book Discussion Questions or Ideas:

  • Where would you prefer to live:  Opium or Aztlan?  What are the pros and cons of each?
  • Matt has a complicated relationship with El Patron.  When he leaves Opium, why might El Patron be included in the group of people Matt cries for?
  • Are clones their own entities?

Why I Chose This:

I chose this novel because Matt’s character was compelling, as was his story.  All teenagers are searching for their identities, and Matt had the added element that he was a clone of someone else.  The setting was also interesting, as it was a real place, just set in the future.  I was also curious as to how Farmer envisioned the future of issues like cloning and drug trafficking, and even immigration that are contemporary issues being dealt with today.